"Three Men Make a Tiger" (三人成虎) is a powerful idiom that serves as a cautionary tale about the influence of repeated falsehoods. It encourages vigilance, critical thinking, and a healthy skepticism towards unverified information, making it a timeless and universally applicable piece of wisdom.

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The Chinese idiom "jū yī fǎn sān" (举一反三) translates to "To find three other things from one example." This phrase is attributed to Confucius, who emphasized the importance of critical thinking and the ability to infer and deduce new information from a single piece of knowledge.

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The Chinese idiom "shuǐ luò shí chū" (水落石出) translates to "When the water subsides, the rock will emerge." This phrase originates from the Song Dynasty, attributed to the renowned Chinese philosopher and writer Su Shi (苏轼).

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The Chinese idiom "shǒu zhū dài tù" (守株待兔) translates to "Stay by a tree stump and wait for a rabbit to turn up." This idiom originates from a story in the "Han Feizi," a collection of writings by the ancient Chinese philosopher Han Fei from the Warring States period.

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The Chinese idiom "熟能生巧" (shú néng shēng qiǎo) translates to "practice makes perfect" or "skill comes from practice." This phrase emphasizes that proficiency and expertise are achieved through consistent practice and experience.

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"To have bamboo in one's chest" (胸有成竹, xiōng yǒu chéng zhú) is a Chinese idiom that conveys the idea of having a well-thought-out plan or being confident and assured in one's approach.

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"Heart like still water" is a Chinese idiom that epitomizes a state of calmness and tranquility. It signifies a mind that remains serene and unaffected by external influences, akin to a still pond undisturbed by the wind.

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"Tranquility yields transcendence" (宁静致远) is a Chinese idiom that encapsulates the idea that inner peace and calm can lead to profound insight and success.

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天外有天" (Tiān wài yǒu tiān): Exploring the Chinese Idiom that translates to "There are Skies Beyond Our Skies".

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This seemingly whimsical expression of Qǐrén Yōu Tiān hides a profound lesson about the dangers of groundless anxiety. In this blog post, we will delve into the origin, meaning, and modern-day usage of this intriguing idiom.

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This common expression (idiom) in Chinese is that experienced individuals, like the old horses in the story, have knowledge and wisdom that allows them to provide valuable guidance to others.

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"A Frog at the bottom of a well" is a common Chinese idiom or phrase used to describe a person with limited outlook. Here is the (translated) folktale about the origin of the phrase.

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This quote by Confucius, "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated," offers a relevant lesson for today.

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The proverb, "Dripping water can penetrate the stone." 水滴石穿 (shuǐ dī shí chuān) illustrates the power of persistence and perseverance.

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The proverb "知己知彼,百战不殆" (zhī jǐ zhī bǐ, bǎi zhàn bù dài), meaning "Know yourself and know your enemy, and you will never be defeated in a hundred battles," is from Sun Tzu's ancient Chinese military treatise, "The Art of War" (孫子兵法).

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The proverb, "To know the road ahead, ask those who traveled it before."

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The quote "Never admire a man by his strength; judge him on how he uses it" is commonly attributed to Zhuangzi (庄子), an influential Daoist philosopher from ancient China.

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The proverb, "The Master Leads You to the Door, the Rest is Up to You". The literal translation suggests that the master or teacher can lead you to the entrance, but the actual cultivation or practice depends on the individual.

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